Millage money

Looking+through+a+book%2C+sophomore+Anya+Jones+studies+for+school.+%E2%80%9C%5BThe+school+needs+a+higher+budget%5D+because+this+book+is+falling+apart+and+multiple+other+books+I%E2%80%99ve+had+in+the+past+have+also+fallen+apart+or+had+stuff+written+in+them%2C%E2%80%9D+she+said.+The+millage+vote+could+increase+school+funding+across+Macomb+county.

Looking through a book, sophomore Anya Jones studies for school. “[The school needs a higher budget] because this book is falling apart and multiple other books I’ve had in the past have also fallen apart or had stuff written in them,” she said. The millage vote could increase school funding across Macomb county.

Danielle M Carlisi, Staff Writer

The upcoming Macomb county millage vote asks residents to vote on enhancing the public school budgets for those schools in Macomb.
“I think it’s a good thing to put more money into schools; it will help educate kids,” sophomore Gianna Brock said.
The millage vote takes place on March 10 and could increase property tax revenue by an additional $1.9 mills. It would cost approximately $190 per year on a home valued at $200,000, according to misd.net.
“[The tax enhancement] would definitely help public schools, but there are going to be people who don’t want to pay that extra $200 a year,” junior Erin Vanderbrink said.
Utica Community Schools would directly receive $11 million if the county approves the enhancement, according to uticak12.org. This factors out to an additional $400 per student, per year, starting in July 2020.
“We could get better desks, more paper to write on—for any supplies, so teachers can increase our education,” sophomore Riley Demond said.
Districts can apply millage funds how they see fit, unlike bond funds that must go toward a pre-determined part of the school. The money can potentially go towards improving salaries for teachers, textbooks, technology and school buildings, according to misd.net.
“I support [the millage enhancement] because my mother is a teacher, so I know what it’s like to not have enough money to give students the education they deserve,” Demond said. “She has to buy her own supplies to support her children.”